Wheat and gluten flours: the flours you don't use in wheat free cooking

There are many varieties of wheat and it is the staple food of many countries. A grain of wheat consists of an outer coating (bran), the embryo (wheat germ) and the endosperm (floury part).

During milling the endosperm is ground into varying sized particles producing flour and semolina. Some people with wheat allergy or intolerance have been able to tolerate semolina in small amounts, however all parts of the wheat grain should be avoided to be on the safe side.

Bulgar flour

This is made from wheat and should be avoided for wheat free cooking.

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Brown flour

This flour contains the wheat germ and a small amount of bran and should be avoided for wheat free cooking.

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Cake flour

Soft flour made from grinding soft wheat. Should be avoided for wheat free cooking.

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Durum flour

This is made from wheat and should be avoided for wheat free cooking.

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Granary flour

A mixture of wholemeal, white and rye flours with malted grains. Should be avoided for wheat free cooking.

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Graham flour

This flour is like wholemeal flour but has had the wheat germ removed and flakes of bran added. Should be avoided for wheat free cooking.

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Kamut flour

This is made from wheat and should be avoided for wheat free cooking.

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Plain flour

Multi-purpose wheat flour. Should be avoided for wheat free cooking.

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Sauce flour

Special flour used for making sauces, common to restaurants using flour based sauces and should be avoided for wheat free cooking.

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Self-raising flour

Made from wheat and should be avoided for wheat free cooking.

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Semolina flour

This is ground from durum wheat and should be avoided for wheat free cooking. The very fine version is known as semola di grano, and will be found in pastas and breads.

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Spelt flour

Despite what many flour and product manufacturers will tell you, spelt is an ancient form of wheat and should be avoided for wheat free cooking.

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Strong flour

This flour is made from hard wheat with high gluten content. Should be avoided for wheat free cooking.

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Triticale flour

Triticale is another name for wheat. It is an ancient hybrid of rye and wheat and so should be avoided for wheat free cooking. The term triticale is often used in many product ingredient lists, especially beauty products, which can cause confusion and not necessarily be identified as the cause of a bad reaction.

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Wheat flour

Produced from grinding wheat which produces different qualities/types of flour. All flours produced from wheat must be avoided for wheat free cooking.

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Wheaten cornflour

Ground from wheat and therefore not to be confused with cornflour which is ground from corn. Must be avoided for wheat free cooking.

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Wholemeal flour

Also known as wholewheat or wheatmeal flour and is made from the whole wheat grain. Should be avoided for wheat free cooking.

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